This study sought to evaluate how infusion-related reactions (IRRs) related to treatment with daratumumab were affected by premedication with montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist. The rationale for this stems from the high incidence of IRRs (up to 71% of patients in one phase I trial) and the requirement for relatively long infusion times (over 7 h for the first infusion).

A total of 348 patients were enrolled in an Early Access Program. Pre- and post-infusion systemic corticosteroids and post-infusion inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators were prescribed. Montelukast was used randomly in 50 patients based on investigator discretion.

The results of this study showed that the use of montelukast resulted in an IRR rate of 38% vs. 58.5% for those who did not receive montelukast for the first infusion. The rate of respiratory IRRs decreased from 32% to 20% and the rate of gastrointestinal IRRs decreased from 11% to 4%. In addition, the median duration time of IRRs was reduced from 7.6 to 6.7 h with the use of montelukast. The authors concluded that further studies to evaluate montelukast would be useful, suggesting perhaps a randomized trial.

The major limitation of this study is in the design, as patients were not randomized to receive or not receive montelukast. It is unclear why some patients were offered montelukast while others were not; there was likely some bias for its use. Furthermore, it was not clear whether the patients who received montelukast had all received the same other premedications.

Finally, the objective of making daratumumab infusions more tolerable and quicker warrants further investigation, and perhaps this abstract can give us some clues on how to approach it.

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june2016
Contributors

Dr. Berinstein
Neil Berinstein, MD, FRCPC, ABIM
Dr. Neil Berinstein earned his premedical degree and medical doctorate from the University of Manitoba and received further specialty and research training at the University of Toronto and Stanford University. Dr. Berinstein currently holds multiple academic and professional positions, including Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto, and is an active staff member of the Hematology Oncology Site Group in the Odette Cancer Program at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. He is currently the Director of Translational Research at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. Dr. Berinstein specializes in the management and research of patients with lymphoproliferative disorders, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, and myeloma.

Dr. Cheson
Bruce D. Cheson, MD, FACP, FAAS, FASCO
Dr. Bruce Cheson completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Virginia Hospitals and then a clinical and research fellowship in Hematology at New England Medical Center Hospital. He is former Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Advances in Hematology and Oncology and Clinical Lymphoma, Leukemia and Myeloma, and a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. From 2002 to 2006, he was on the Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He is past-Chair of the Lymphoma Committee of the Cancer and Leukemia Group B/Alliance, the Scientific Advisory Board of the Lymphoma Research Foundation, and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Subcommittee on Lymphoma. Currently, Dr. Cheson is Professor of Medicine, Head of Hematology, and Deputy Chief of Hematology-Oncology at Georgetown University Hospital, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Cheson’s clinical interests focus on the development and evaluation of new therapeutic approaches for hematologic malignancies.

Dr. Connors
Joseph Connors, MD, FRCPC
Dr. Joseph Connors earned his medical degree from Yale University. He completed his residency training in Internal Medicine and chief residency at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Prior to completing his Medical Oncology Fellowship at Stanford University, he worked at the Indian Health Service in Alaska for two years. In 1981, he accepted a position in Medical Oncology at the BC Cancer Agency. He has been a member of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia since that time, reaching the position of Clinical Professor in 1997. At present, he is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, at the University of British Columbia and the Chair of the Lymphoma Tumour Group for the BC Cancer Agency. Dr. Connors’ clinical activities and research efforts are focused in the area of lymphoid cancers. He is best known for his clinical investigations into the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and multiple myeloma.

Dr. LeBlanc
Richard LeBlanc, MD, FRCPC
Dr. Richard LeBlanc is a hematologist and medical oncologist at Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont in Montreal, Quebec. He is also a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Montreal. Dr. LeBlanc obtained his medical degree at Laval University and is certified in Internal Medicine, Hematology, and Medical Oncology. He worked as a research fellow at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston from 2000 to 2002. Dr. LeBlanc was recruited by Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont to help improve medical care, research, and teaching in multiple myeloma. Dr. LeBlanc holds the Myeloma Canada Chair at the University of Montreal. He is the Director of the Myeloma Cell Bank at Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, which is affiliated with the Quebec Leukemia Cell Bank. He is also the Medical Director of the Clinical Immunology Laboratory at Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont. Finally, Dr. LeBlanc is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Myeloma Canada.

Dr. Owen
Carolyn Owen, MD, FRCPC
Dr. Carolyn Owen completed postgraduate training in internal medicine and hematology at the University of Ottawa and the University of British Columbia, respectively, followed by a research fellowship in molecular genetics at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry in London, U.K. Her research focused on familial myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia. She is currently an Assistant Professor at the Foothills Medical Centre and Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, and her clinical interests are low-grade lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. She is also the local principal investigator in Calgary for several clinical trials in these areas.

Dr. Peters
Anthea Peters, MD, FRCPC
Dr. Anthea Peters obtained her medical degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 2006. She then completed her residencies in Internal Medicine at the University of Alberta and in Hematology at the University of Calgary. Dr. Peters joined the Division of Hematology at the University of Alberta as a Clinical Scholar in July 2011. Her main area of interest is in lymphoma.